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757 Lack of method statements on domestic projects

Report ID: 757

Published: Newsletter No 53 - January 2019

Report Overview

A reporter has observed that where an opening is being formed on domestic properties for, say a rear extension, that the builders tend to remove the masonry and follow up with the temporary propping.

Report Content

On a number of occasions, a reporter has observed that where an opening is being formed on domestic properties for, say a rear extension, that the builders tend to remove the masonry and follow up with the temporary propping.

This method tends to cause a significant amount of disruption to the structure which must be remedied after the cracking appears. On domestic contracts, the works are usually barely specified, and it's left to the builder to come up with a method of work.

A detailed description of the propping requirements is necessary to counter this issue either in the margin notes on the general layout drawings or in the specification if there is one.

 

Comments

Domestic projects are often procured directly with the builder, by a householder who has not the knowledge or experience to be able to procure or properly specify the works.

The householder is only looking at the final result, and the builder has to ensure it is done in a safe way. There is no qualification or experience requirement for anyone to call themselves a builder. Often there is no engineer involved at all, and if there was one at the design stage they are not present during construction.

It is however the responsibility of the builder to design any temporary works to ensure that the structure is undamaged.

As always, on any project big or small, a proper design should envisage how the structure is going to get from where it is ‘now’ to where the finished design envisages it to be. The general position is that dangers of instability exist in all intermediate stages. There have been significant bridge failures because of overlooking this reality never mind domestic opening up.

Whether the work is domestic or non-domestic, it should be properly planned and carried out in a safe manner. Regardless of the type of project, builders should have the appropriate skills, knowledge, experience and training for the tasks they are undertaking.

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 applies just as much to domestic projects as it does other workplaces (unless it’s DIY) and CDM 2015 has brought domestic projects in scope where previously they were exempt from certain duties.

The Federation of Master Builders has published Licence to build: A pathway to licensing UK construction which makes the case for builders to be licenced.

 

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View other CROSS reports published in Newsletter No. 53


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